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“Builders of God’s Temple”- “The Invited Feast” (1 Co 3:9-17, & Matthew 22:2-14

Title: "Builders of God's Temple"


Introduction:

In 1 Corinthians 3:9-17, the Apostle Paul uses vivid imagery to convey profound spiritual truths about the Church as God's temple. Through this passage, he addresses the Corinthian believers, emphasizing the importance of their role as builders in God's divine construction. Let's delve into the scripture to unravel the layers of meaning and extract the timeless lessons it imparts.


1 Corinthians 3:9-17 (NIV):

"For we are co-workers in God's service; you are God's field, God's building."


Summary:

In this passage, Paul introduces a symbolic framework, likening the Corinthian believers to co-workers in God's service, with their collective existence forming God's field and building. He stresses believers' unity and interdependence, highlighting their responsibility in constructing the spiritual edifice of God's temple. The foundation laid by Christ is crucial, and Paul warns against using inferior materials that may compromise the integrity of the structure. The imagery serves as a call to spiritual maturity and a reminder of each believer's accountability for their contributions to the communal faith structure. Paul concludes by underscoring the sacredness of God's temple, admonishing those who seek to destroy it with divisive actions.


Title: "The Invited Feast"


Introduction:

In Matthew 22:2-14, Jesus unfolds a parable that vividly depicts an extravagant feast, emphasizing the urgency and significance of responding to God's invitation. Through this narrative, Jesus addresses the responsiveness of those invited to the kingdom of heaven, revealing deeper truths about the nature of acceptance and readiness. Let's explore the layers of meaning in this passage to glean valuable insights for our spiritual journey.


Matthew 22:2-14 (NIV):

"The kingdom of heaven is like a king who prepared a wedding banquet for his son."


Summary:

In this parable, Jesus compares the kingdom of heaven to a royal wedding feast. The king symbolizes God, the banquet represents the kingdom, and the son is none other than Jesus himself. Invitations are extended, but the response of the guests varies. Some reject the call with indifference, others violently oppose it, while a select few enthusiastically embrace the invitation. The king, angered by the refusal of the initial guests, opens the doors to all, gathering both good and evil into the wedding hall. However, a guest is cast out for lacking the appropriate attire, signifying the importance of a genuine, transformed heart in responding to God's call. This parable serves as a poignant reminder of the urgency and authenticity required in accepting the divine invitation to partake in the heavenly feast.


In Christ, love ❤️ Jared W. Campbell



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